17 August 2015

2015 Eagles Preseason Week 1 Review

A quick review of the 2015 Eagles Preseason Week 1, with a focus on bubble players.

Upvotes ↑
QB Barkley: Consistent and on-target; I'm still not a fan but he's playing better than Tebow so far
RB Barner: So far, he's making a tough choice for the coaches on whether to go with 4 RBs
TE Tomlinson: Will the team keep 4 TEs like last year? If so, he has a shot
OLB Braman: Already a solid+ special teamer; but played well at OLB too
CB Biggers: Made a few key plays and will keep his name in the conversation for the last CB spot
S: Reynolds: Two picks and nearly a third may help force his way onto the roster; Watkins look out!

Downvotes ↓
QB Tebow: First series impressive; disappointing after that
T Graf: Got beat badly on several plays against inferior competition
CB/S Watkins: Looked unimpressive; beaten on several plays

Need More Info
G Bunche
G Moffitt
CB Evans

Roster Movement
With JaCorey Shepherd's ACL tear, I moved Jaylen Watkins into his roster spot. However, he didn't look very impressive on Sunday so he's definitely on the bubble. Ed Reynolds and EJ Biggers both played well and have every opportunity to move into that spot.

02 August 2015

2015 Eagles projected 53-man roster (training camp version)


As I said back in March, the Eagles roster will undoubtedly undergo a number of changes between now and September due to free agency, trades, the draft, and injuries. A half dozen or more names could change. But if the team had to pare its current roster to 53 right now, based on players that the team currently controls, what would that roster look like? Here's my look as training camp opens today. The five players in bold are my last five (bubble) players.

QB (3): Bradford, Sanchez, Tebow
RB (3): Murray, Mathews, Sproles
WR (6): Matthews, Huff, Agholor, Cooper, Austin, Ajirotutu
TE (3): Celek, Ertz, Burton
C (2): Kelce, Molk
G (4): Barbre, Gardner, Tobin, Moffitt
T (4): Peters, Johnson, Andrews, Graf

DL (7): Cox, Logan, Thornton, Bair, Allen, Curry, Mihalik
LB (9): Barwin, Kendricks, Alonso, Graham, Smith, Hicks, Ryans, Braham, Jones
CB (5): Rowe, Maxwell, Carroll, Shepherd, Evans
S: (4) Jenkins, Thurmond, Maragos, Prosinski

P: Jones
PK: Parkey
LS: Dorenbos

It's not too difficult to project the first 48 or so players on the roster but the last group of 4-5 players is always very difficult.

First five out: Barkley, Acho, Goode, Watkins, Wolff

 I've learned with Chip Kelly that those last few spots come down to versatility (special teams) and injuries. Here are a few close calls that could go either way:

QB: Tebow > Barkley

OL: Not at all confident in the offensive line depth. Training camp could definitely make a difference in the third and/or fourth guard or tackle. I have John Moffitt on the bubble, but he could easily move up with a good camp.

S: Earl Wolff should be in the mix, but the injury bug may really hurt his chances of making the roster especially with Walter Thurmond switching to safety. Given the value that Chip places on special teams players, it would be difficult to see him part with Maragos or Prosinski, both of whom were among the league's best last year. Only time will tell.

30 July 2015

DerbyCon talk: "The Law of Drones"

Great news--I was accepted to speak at DerbyCon! Here's the abstract for my talk:

A decade ago, drones were mostly associated with terrorist strikes in the Middle East. Since then, the proliferation of drone technology has resulted in widespread deployment of unmanned aerial systems for law enforcement, commercial, and personal use.  The recent drone crash on the White House lawn has sparked a renewed interest in unmanned aerial systems by governments, commercial users, and hobbyists. Recent events have also put a spotlight onto the Federal Aviation Administration's renewed efforts to regulate drones. This talk will review the history and development of laws, rules, and regulations regarding model aircraft, drones, and other unmanned aerial systems. Next, we will survey the legal landscape to understand current efforts by the FAA and other governmental bodies to restrict and regulate drones for personal users while expanding opportunities by governmental users. Finally, we will look at the way forward in an opportunity to evaluate the balance between the rights of drone users and the privacy expectations of citizens. If you're interested in learning more about model aircraft, drones, and other unmanned aerial systems, come check it out!

26 June 2015

Law in Plain English: Johnson v. United States

This is one in a series of posts designed to describe court decisions in plain English. For more detail and background on the legal issues, see the link to the case below. For similar posts, click here.

SCOTUSblogJohnson v. United States

Argument: Nov 5 2014 (Aud.)

Background: Pursuant to an undercover investigation, the FBI determined that Samuel Johnson (a felon) illegally possessed an AK-47 and a .22 caliber semi-automatic rifle. Johnson was later arrested while attending a meeting with his probation officer. Among other charges, Johnson was indicted with being an armed career criminal in possession of a firearm. The Armed Career Criminal Act (ACCA) provides a mandatory 15-year sentence for those who have been convicted of three "violent felon[ies.]" Johnson pleaded guilty, but reserved the right to challenge the applicability of the ACCA based upon a review of his prior convictions. On appeal, Johnson alleged that a prior conviction for possession of a short-barreled shotgun did not constitute a "violent felony." The Eighth Circuit disagreed, finding that possession of a short-barreled shotgun presented a serious risk of physical injury to another because it is roughly similar to the listed offenses within the ACCA, both in kind as well as the degree of risk for harm posed. As a result, the conviction was considered a violent felony and Johnson's conviction as an armed career criminal was affirmed.

Issue: The question before the Court is whether mere possession of a short-barreled shotgun should be treated as a violent felony under the Armed Career Criminal Act.

Holding: In an 8-1 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that imposing an increased sentence under ACCA’s residual clause violates due process.

Law in Plain English: Same Sex Marriage Cases

This is one in a series of posts designed to describe court decisions in plain English. For more detail and background on the legal issues, see the link to the case below. For similar posts, click here.

SCOTUSblogObergefell v. Hodges (consolidated with Tanco v. Haslam, DeBoer v. Snyder, Bourke v. Beshear)

Argument: Apr 28 2014 (Aud.)


Background: James Obergefell and John Arthur are from Ohio, and were married in Maryland. When Arthur died, Ohio would not list Obergefell as his spouse on their death certificates. Obergefell sought an injunction to require the State to list him as a spouse on the certificate. The district court concluded that the Fourteenth Amendment protects a fundamental right to keep existing marital relationships intact, and that the State failed to justify its law under heightened scrutiny. The court likewise concluded that classifications based on sexual orientation deserve heightened scrutiny under equal protection, and that Ohio failed to justify its refusal to recognize the couples’ existing marriages. Even under rational basis review, the court added, the State came up short. The Sixth Circuit reversed, finding that the Due Process Clause or the Equal Protection Clause of the Fourteenth Amendment does not require States to expand the definition of marriage to include same-sex couples. Further, the court found that the Constitution does prohibit a State from denying recognition to same-sex marriages conducted in other States.

Issue: The questions before the Court: 1) Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to license a marriage between two people of the same sex? 2) Does the Fourteenth Amendment require a state to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-state?

Holding: In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the Fourteenth Amendment requires a State to license a marriage between two people of the same sex and to recognize a marriage between two people of the same sex when their marriage was lawfully licensed and performed out-of-State.

25 June 2015

Law in Plain English: Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

This is one in a series of posts designed to describe court decisions in plain English. For more detail and background on the legal issues, see the link to the case below. For similar posts, click here.

SCOTUSblogTexas Department of Housing and Community Affairs v. The Inclusive Communities Project, Inc.

Argument: Jan 21 2015 (Aud.)

Background: The Inclusive Communities Project (ICP) is a non-profit organization that assists low-income, predominately African-American families who are eligible for the Dallas Housing Authority’s Section 8 Housing Choice Voucher program in finding affordable housing in predominately Caucasian, suburban neighborhoods. ICP filed suit action against the Texas Department of Housing and Community Affairs (TDHCA) alleging that TDHCA's allocation of Low Income Housing Tax Credits (LIHTC) in Dallas resulted in a disparate impact on African-American residents under the Fair Housing Act (FHA). The district court held that ICP had proven that the allocation of tax credits resulted in a disparate impact on African-American residents. The Fifth Circuit remanded the case to the district court to apply the burden-shifting approach found in HUD regulation 24 C.F.R. § 100.500 for claims of disparate impact under the FHA. First, a plaintiff must prove a prima facie case of discrimination by showing that a challenged practice causes a discriminatory effect. If the plaintiff makes a prima facie case, the defendant must then prove “that the challenged practice is necessary to achieve one or more substantial, legitimate, nondiscriminatory interests....” If the defendant meets its burden, the plaintiff must then show that the defendant’s interests “could be served by another practice that has a less discriminatory effect.”

Issue: The question before the Court is whether disparate-impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act.

Holding: In a 5-4 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that disparate-impact claims are cognizable under the Fair Housing Act.

23 June 2015

You can be outraged over the shooting, but your flag drama is meh

Reactive politics is easy. It's very popular now to call for the removal of the Confederate flag from flying over South Carolina's state house. Why wouldn't it be? It came in reaction to the terrible church shooting last week. But the Confederate flag is no more or lessoffensive now than it was last week, depending upon your point of view. The shooting doesn't somehow make it worse; unless you're willing to admit that you were OK with the flag last week.

If you didn't really spend any time prior to this week really caring about whether the Confederate flag flew over South Carolina's state house, then you're a participant in reactive politics. Great job standing up now. What about last week, last month, or last year (or before)?

Mississippi fans in stands with Confederate flags during a sporting event in 1993.Photo by Patrick Murphy-Racey/Sports Illustrated/Getty Images
Reactive politics takes no courage. It's the mob mentality. This doesn't mean the act itself is worthless. If you want to get rid of the Confederate flag over South Carolina, go for it (although I hope you agree that legislators in South Carolina should make that decision). But don't delude yourself as if you're doing something brave by standing up against the flag.  Courage means perseverance despite difficulty and pain. Chances are you're not putting yourself in any danger by opposing the Confederate flag, especially from the confines of your desk chair.

Much the same is this Internet rant about a man and his neighbor's Confederate flag. He starts off:
While I was out jogging this morning, I passed a neighbor’s house that I have passed every day for almost three years. Usually I stroll right on by without giving it a second thought. Today, though… today was different. I stopped in my tracks and blankly stared until a car honked at me to move out of the way....This house flies a Confederate flag.
Of course. A man who claims to study culture admits that the flag didn't matter to him last week or any other time during the last three years. But it matters now. Reactive politics. How easy to rant. But really, this paragraph captures it for me:
And what about my neighbor? In a perfect world, I would ring his doorbell and have a reasonable discussion with him about how what he’s doing is offensive and ahistoric and I’d love to correct his understanding of the entire mess. But the sad fact is, he’s not alone, either.
So instead of trying to make the world a better place and engaging his neighbor in conversation, he turns to the Internet and calls the man (and presumably anyone else who flies the flag) a racist and a traitor. How courageous, friend! Great job standing up for...what? And way to go on wanting to "correct his understanding of the entire mess." As if the flag has only one exact, factual, historic meaning that he needs explained to him. And you're the one to do it! How convenient. How pompous. And the idea that you can label another man without actually talking to him about his views (when you admit that talking to him is the right thing to do) is not only weak, but it's anathema to constructive dialog.

I know what you might be thinking. Even though you might not have voiced your opinion on the Confederate flag before, you've always thought it was offensive. And the shooting gave you reason to voice your opinion. Fine, I have no problem with that. Whether you want to oppose the Confederate flag now is not my issue. I take aim at those who attach some magical self-importance to their view now that's newsworthy and convenient, as if they're doing something bold. Sorry, you're just not.

Bold are those who stand up for causes when they're not newsworthy or convenient. When it wasn't the outrage of the week. When it was a proactive position, not a reactive one.

By the way, have you ever read the words to Maryland's official state song? You wouldn't be the first one to raise an eyebrow at that one.

What will next week's faux outrage be?

18 June 2015

Law in Plain English: Reed v. Town of Gilbert, Arizona

This is one in a series of posts designed to describe court decisions in plain English. For more detail and background on the legal issues, see the link to the case below. For similar posts, click here.

SCOTUSblogReed v. Town of Gilbert, Arizona

Argument: TBD (Aud.)

Click image to visit ADF website
Background: Good News Community Church placed several signs around the area of its church announcing the time and location of its services. The Town of Gilbert, Arizona notified the Church that its signs were violating Gilbert's sign ordinance because the signs were displayed outside the statutorily-limited time period. The ordinance required that signs could not be erected without a permit, but that three categories of signs were exempted from the permit requirement: 1) temporary directional signs relating to qualifying events (no greater than six feet in height and six square feet in area; only to be displayed for 12 hours before and one hour after an event; not placed in the public right-of-way); 2) political signs (up to 32 square feet in size; erected at any time, but taken down within ten days after an election; may be placed in the public right­-of-way); and 3) ideological signs (not limited in time or number; may be placed in the public right-of-way). The district court found that the ordinance was not a content-based regulation; was a reasonable time, place, and manner restriction; and (on remand) did not favor some noncommercial speech over other commercial speech. The Ninth Circuit affirmed.

Issue: The question before the Court is whether the Town of Gilbert's mere assertion that its sign code lacks a discriminatory motive renders its facially content-based sign code content-neutral and justifies the code's differential treatment of petitioners' religious signs.

Holding: In a 9-0 decision, the Supreme Court ruled that the Sign Code’s provisions are content-based regulations of speech that do not survive strict scrutiny. Because content-based laws target speech based on its communicative content, they are presumptively unconstitutional and may be justified only if the government proves that they are narrowly tailored to serve compelling state interests. The Sign Code’s content-based restrictions do not survive strict scrutiny because the Town has not demonstrated that the Code’s differentiation between temporary directional signs and other types of signs furthers a compelling governmental interest and is narrowly tailored to that end.