17 May 2013

Words mean things, law school edition

Here are the requirements to join the UDC Law Review:
Membership
Students may receive offers to join the UDC Law Review staff by grading on and/or writing on.
Grading On
Students who have completed at least thirty hours of coursework and are in good standing, as defined by the UDC David A. Clarke School of Law Student Handbook, are eligible to grade on to the law review by exceeding a 3.2 GPA and receiving a “B” final grade in Lawyering Process I and II. Offers of membership to students who grade on are sent before the start of the Fall semester. Students who are eligible to grade on may also participate in the write-on competition, regardless of their expected or actual grades. No distinction is made within the Law Review staff between students who grade on and those who write on.
Writing On 
Students who are not eligible to grade on to the law review may attempt to write on. Materials for the write-on competition are posted on this page at the end of the Spring semester. Students typically have two weeks to complete the submission, which consists of a Bluebook exercise, an editing exercise, and a legal essay based on a closed-universe of cases and articles provided by the Law Review staff. The essays are graded anonymously and offers of membership to students who write on are sent before the start of the Fall semester.
To summarize, you can grade on (with a GPA requirement, a Lawyering Process grade requirement, and a 30 credit hour requirement); or you can write on ("Students who are not eligible to grade on").

Just to be clear, I emailed the Law Review back in April:
Will part-time 1L's be eligible to grade on to law review?
The answer:
If you have completed LP I and II then you will be eligible to grade on law review as a part-time 1L, rising 2L.  Thanks for your question.
Except this isn't the case--the 30 credit hour limit applies to both grading on and writing on. I only know this because a fellow student told me he was confused about whether or not we could participate. Fortunately, I had completed only a smart part of the write on before I realized this. Yes, I did Bluebook exercises that I didn't have to do.

On top of that, members of the Law Review made several announcements in our part-time, 1L classes (in which almost no one has yet met the 30 credit hour requirement).

Lesson learned, especially for those studying to be lawyers: Words mean things!
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